Details for Kid's Scoop

© 2017 by Vicki Whiting, Editor

Jeff Schinkel, Graphics

Vol. 33, No. 44

Match each acorn to the kind of oak tree it comes from. Do the
math to check your answers.

In winter, many kinds
of oak trees, being
deciduous, lose
their leaves.
During that
time when
sunlight is
especially precious
for warmth, the oak tree’s
leafless branches let the
sun shine through.

Oak trees make
good shade trees
because they grow
tall and wide
enough to
create a big
canopy that
you can sit
under on a hot,
sunny day.
A canopy
is a covering,
either natural
or man-made.

and try
an acorne tree. It
k
ic
p
’t
ff th alled
Don
right o
c
to eat it of chemicals rrible
ll
fu
is
t taste teu sick.
a
th
s
tanninuld make yo e used
and co acorns can b al must
Before food, the me red.
a
e
to mak arefully prep
be c

Mrs. Irwin’s Super
Stars from Leeds
Elementary share
their thoughts about
climbing up the “old
oak tree”.

Oak trees provided more than shade for the first Americans.
Their fruit, known as acorns, were an essential source of
food for Native Americans from coast to coast.
The acorns were ground into a meal that was used to make
mush or pounded with meat, fat and berries to make
pemmican, a paste that dries into chewy, nutritious strips.

Read the steps that Native
Americans followed to remove
tannins from acorns. Then number
the pictures in the correct order.
1. Shell the acorns by splitting the
outer shell and removing the
light-colored inner nut.
2. Grind the shelled acorns into a
fine meal.

DECIDUOUS
PEMMICAN
SUNLIGHT
POUNDED
TANNINS
NATIVE
CANOPY
ACORN
COAST
SHELL
SHADE
PASTE
MEAT
MUSH
OAK

Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week’s Kid Scoop
stories and activities.
G S H E L L R O W P
T P U E D A H S O S
H E T O A K C U C Y
G M H S U M N O E P
I M E A L D A V R O
L I L A E S

I A N N

N C D D T T N C I A
U A D P A S T E E C
S N I N N A T E R D

3. Scoop the pounded meal into a
basket.
With a friend, take turns drawing a
horizontal or vertical line between two dots.
Completing a square is worth 1 point.
If there’s an acorn in the box, that’s
worth 5 points.

4. Rinse the acorn meal with hot
water to wash away the tannins.
The meal must be rinsed at least
ten times, or more if cold water
is used.

Look through the newspaper for pictures and
words that show you it is fall in your town.
Cut these out and make a “Fall in My Town”
poster. Bonus Challenge: Put the words you
find in ABC order.

5. Add water to the leached meal
and stir with a hot rock lodged
into a looped stick.
6. Add berries, seeds or dried meat
for flavor.
7. Eat!

Nutshell is a compound word.
Draw a line from each acorn cap
to a nut to form compound words.

Climbing up the Old
Oak Tree..
The feeling of the rough
bark of a tree scraped
the palms of my hands
as I gripped it. The
smell of the oak filled
my nose, a familiar
scent. The sounds of the
squirrels scurrying up the
tree, the birds melodic
songs filling the air,
and the wind whistling
through the leaves. The
taste of the crisp air on

my tongue, seeming like
an ambrosia. Best of all,
the sight of all the nature
around me, the beauty
of creation.
The oak tree became
even more majestic as
I climbed it, every inch
holding another secret
of nature. A simple
tree creating a whole
new world to see, a
simple tree. The world
appeared to be much
more real than it ever

had before. It was
almost as though I was
looking through the eyes
of an owl high in the
sky, a squirrel burrowing
in the tree, or a deer in
the middle of a forest.
All of the work it took
to climb this simple
tree, seeming like an
inexpensive price for the
beauty of creation.
Isabel Martinez
Holy Cross

yard and I saw food.
Eulalia F.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I saw a spider
and a web.
Maranda K.

For five minutes,
look through the
newspaper or your
newspaper’s
website for
compound words.
Then have a friend
try. Who found the
most compound
words?

Ms. Jungers’
Kindergarten students
at Hunt Elementary love
climbing up trees...any
tree!
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I fell.
Lillianna H.
I was climbing up
the oak tree in the
back yard and I saw a
raccoon.
Vincent V.
I was climbing up the

Science in
Your Life

Send your story to:

How has science
made your life better?
Deadline: November 5 Published: Week of Dec. 3
Please include your school and grade.

oak tree in the back
yard and I fell and got
hurt.
Tan N.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I heard birds.
Francia L.
I was climbing up
the oak tree in the
back yard and I saw a
squirrel. Wednesday C.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I heard an
owl.
Nia S.

I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I saw an
eagle. Mauricio M.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard, I saw some birds
taking care of eggs.
Mia E.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back
yard and I saw a lion.
Ana E.
I was climbing up the
oak tree in the back

I was climbing up the
oak tree in my backyard
when I saw a grey fox.
It didn’t run at all and
I noticed it had a hurt
paw. I went down and
cared for the fox then
brought her up to my
treehouse. I laid her
down on a rug then
went to get her water
and turkey meat. As I
put the water in front of
her she quickly drank
it up. After a couple of
hours the fox looked fine
so I let her free. In my
mind I named her Kit!
Nyamal
The Mighty Oak Tree is
where I would climb up
to the top with a friend
and look at cars and
other friends’ houses. It
would be fun staying in
the oak tree. Jonathan
I was climbing an
oak tree and my dog
came running up to me
because he loves the
treehouse.We played
X-box and listened to
music in the oak tree.
My treehouse in the
oak tree is so cool. You
should make a cool oak
treehouse, too. Kyra
I was climbing up
the oak tree in my
backyard. I stayed
there and slept in my
treehouse every day! I
Love It! Jade
Triston: I was climbing
up the oak tree in my
backyard. My mom and
dad helped me built the
treehouse. I like staying
in my treehouse.

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