Forget the lions and tigers and bears, these high schools went above and beyond on their mascot selection. 

Abington Galloping Ghosts (PA) -- Honors early football great Red Grange, nicknamed the "Galloping Ghost," who was a teammate of a former coach at Abington. After a visit by Grange to the area in the 1950's, the high school decided to name its teams after him. 

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Blooming Prairie Awesome Blossoms

Blooming Prairie Awesome Blossoms (MN) -- A writer from a paper in a nearby town dubbed the athletes from Blooming Prairie as "the boys from blossom town." The current logo featuring a ferocious-looking flower was created in the 1970s. 

Blooming Prairie Awesome Blossoms (MN) -- A writer from a paper in a nearby town dubbed the athletes from Blooming Prairie as "the boys from blossom town." The current logo featuring a ferocious-looking flower was created in the 1970s. 

Boiling Springs Bubblers (PA) -- Named for the cold bubbling limestone springs located in the town. 

Cairo Syrupmakers (GA) -- One story says this mascot was inspired by a rainy football game when the owner of a local syrup plant helped out the home team by giving the players ponchos that had "Roddenbury Syrup" written across them. Another story says a newspaper reporter referred to the Tigers as "the syrupmakers from Cairo" in a game story, probably because there was a syrup plant in Cairo at the time. The mascot is depicted as a syrup pitcher. The term is often shortened to "Maids" for the girls or "Makers" for the boys. 

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Center Point-Urbana Stormin' Pointers

Center Point-Urbana Stormin' Pointers (Center Point, IA)-- Prior to merging, Center Point was the "Pointers," and Urbana was the "Cyclones." Symbolized by a pointer dog in the midst of a cyclone

Center Point-Urbana Stormin' Pointers (Center Point, IA)-- Prior to merging, Center Point was the "Pointers," and Urbana was the "Cyclones." Symbolized by a pointer dog in the midst of a cyclone

Doane Stuart Thunder Chicken (Albany, NY) -- This is a mythical animal, of course. It stands 6 and a half feet tall, is yellow and orange, and brandishes a lightning bolt. It's also known to play the bagpipes. The school gym is known as the "Chicken Coop."

Frankfort Hot Dogs (IN) -- In 1956, Frankfort high school adopted the Hot Dogs moniker. Rumor has it a sportswriter from Lafayette said during a game "the players looked like a bunch of hot dogs out there." The name is symbolized by an angry dachshund. The town's signature event is the Hot Dog Festival, named in part after the school's mascot. 

Freeport Pretzels (IL) -- The town had two major economic products: beer and pretzels. Since the "Brewers" was deemed inappropriate for a high school mascot, the school went with the other choice.

Lewisville Fighting Farmers (TX) -- The town's main water tower is emblazoned with a farmer on a horse. 

Martha's Vineyard Vineyarders (Oak Bluffs, MA) -- The school seems to have used an extension of the area's name to create this mascot. 

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Mount Clemens Battling Bathers

Mount Clemens Battling Bathers (MI) -- At one time, the city of Mount Clemens was world famous for its mineral baths which allegedly could cure a myriad of illnesses. 

Newell Irrigators (SD) -- The town's early development was aided in part by the building of the nearby Orman Dam. The dam provided a water supply for farm and ranch irrigation.

Punxsutawney Chucks (PA) – Short for "Woodchucks," another name for groundhogs. Punxsutawney is known as the "weather capital of the world." The town is home to Punxsutawney Phil, a groundhog (or woodchuck) who emerges every Groundhog Day (February 2) to predict the arrival of spring weather. 

St. John Military Muleskinners (Salina, KS) -- A slang term for one who drives mules. A school logo includes a soldier on a wagon driving his team. The students are also dubbed "Cadets" because of the type of school they attend. 

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Stuyvesant Peglegs

Stuyvesant Peglegs (New York, NY) -- School namesake Peter Stuyvesant was the Dutch colonial governor of New York. He had a wooden leg, hence the name "Peglegs." 

Watersmeet Nimrods (MI) -- This school began using "Nimrod" as its mascot in 1904. According to the Old Testament, Nimrod was "a mighty hunter before the Lord." Watersmeet, situated in the heart of the Upper Peninsula's Ottawa National Forest, adopted the name because the forest is prime hunting land. 

Webb Feet (Bell Buckle, TN) -- This mascot was adopted in the 1970s, replacing "Scholars." Girls' teams at Webb are known as "Lady Feet." 

Williamsport Millionaires (Williamsport, PA) -- During the mid-1800's, Williamsport was known as the "lumber capital of the world" and boasted more millionaires per capita than anyplace else in the country. The athletic logo is a pair of white gloves draped over a cane and top hat.

Winters Blizzards (TX) -- This mascot seems to be the result of wordplay using the school's name. 

Zeeland East Chix (Zeeland, MI) -- Zeeland was known between 1930 and 1950 for its chick hatcheries. In the 1940's, firms in Zeeland were producing about 18,000,000 chicks per year and providing employment for about 3,000 people. 

Zeeland West Dux (Zeeland, MI) -- Zeeland East High's teams are known as "Chix," so Zeeland West chose a name that was somewhat related to their rival's mascot. 

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