Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Frances McDormand as Mildred Hayes in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Merrick Morton

I have a love-hate relationship with award shows.

As much as I love seeing the cast and crew of some of my favorite films and TV shows receive honors for their work, that love quickly dwindles when I have to sit through hours of bloated Oscar speeches and badly written (or improvised) interactions between award presenters, on top of wondering why the Golden Globes haven’t reworked its Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy category.

Despite my grievances, I still end up watching the Golden Globes or Academy Awards shows like some kind of compulsive moviegoer with Stockholm syndrome.

Nominations for this year’s Golden Globe Awards were announced recently, as were the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards nominees. Fed up with the Golden Globes once again – seriously, I can’t get over some of these category choices – I turned my attention to the SAG Awards. I can honestly say I’ve never watched the broadcasted SAG Awards show once in my life. Perhaps that will change this year.

I was pleased to find the SAG Awards nominations hadn’t been split up into genres or spread too thin. All of the awards, by the way, are primarily performance driven, so no directing, writing or special effects nods in this awards gathering.

As such, I thought I would give my predictions in the movie categories. I’m so far behind the current TV trends that I think it is best not to give my two cents on that topic. Movies, however, are my specialty. 

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Either Timothee Chalamet in “Call Me by Your Name” or Gary Oldman in “Darkest Hour.” This one is a bit of a tossup. On one hand, Chalamet has the more emotional performance, but on the other, it’s Gary friggin’ Oldman as Winston Churchill. Oldman’s performance might even be the best thing about “Darkest Hour.” However, Chalamet has been given a considerable amount of praise for his role as young man discovering his sexuality. Chalamet is rather new to the awards game, but this could be his year.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Frances McDormand in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” McDormand might be one of my favorite actresses of all time; she won me over in “Fargo” and I’ve been a fan ever since. She’s a strong contender for the award for her role in “Three Billboards” as a grieving mother with a foul mouth. Her only Oscar win was in 1996’s “Fargo,” so it would be nice to see her win this SAG Award. But I'm also a bit biased... That being said, Saoirse Ronan could walk away with the win for her work in "Lady Bird."

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Why Armie Hammer wasn't included on the list of nominees is beyond me. That would have been my first choice. But a close second might be Sam Rockwell in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri." Rockwell is a great character who has seen his name on lots of nomination ballots. He did, however, earn a Hollywood Supporting Actor Award at the Hollywood Film Awards in November. Some critics have said Rockwell stood out more than his co-star McDormand. 

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

If I had to guess which two actresses had the best chances of winning this SAG Award, I would say Allison Janney in “I, Tonya” or Laurie Metcalf in “Lady Bird.” It's a tough choice. Janney has been the recipient of six SAG Awards in her career and her role in "I, Tonya" looks like it might just steal the whole movie. On the other hand, critics are praising Metcalf in "Lady Bird" just as much as Ronan. I'll give the edge to Metcalf, who seems to be getting better and better with each role she's given -- theater, TV and movies alike. She's certainly come a long way since "Roseanne."

0
0
0
0
0

Weekender reporter

Load comments