It was a virtual band clinic in Grandview Park Saturday when both Trombone Shorty and The Revivalists offered up instrumental pyrotechnics as part of Saturday in the Park.

Two of three headliners (Joss Stone held the third spot), the acts gave the crowd a hefty dose of their New Orleans prowess. The inspired performances made all the audience sweating seem insignificant.

Troy Andrews – who goes by Trombone Shorty – was such a consummate performer he managed to play trombone, trumpet and tambourine, sing and moonwalk in one song -- the infectious “On The Way Down.” Backed by his brass-heavy (two saxophones, no waiting) band Orleans Avenue, he gave the 2017 event its vibe. The day’s sparkplug, he also had Revivalists lead singer David Shaw grooving in the background.

Because he’s so versatile, Andrews never let the excitement lag. Clearly, he and his band are doing for New Orleans what Chicago did for its city.

Orleans Avenue took his challenge repeatedly and offered up its own dance moves and solo sparks.

Music directors in area schools would be wise to turn their students onto Shorty and company.

The Revivalists offered their clinic, too, even though all seven didn’t get the same kind of spotlight.

Shaw, however, was so eager to join the crowd he repeatedly jumped off the stage to interact.

Though new to Sioux City, the New Orleans-based band mashed up a number of musical styles designed to please an eclectic crowd.

Shaw and saxophonist Rob Ingraham grooved around the stage, too, approximating a SoulCycle workout.

“You and I” let Shaw demonstrate his facility with rap (and that desire to get into the crowd); “Stand Up” gave him an opportunity to interact with Ingraham, who got a fairly good solo.

The seven-piece band included brass as well but didn’t overwhelm. Instead, the ever-moving Shaw was always the centerpiece, pulling off pieces of clothing as he made his way around the stage.  He had a beautiful voice, full of emotion and capable of great range that didn’t wane the more active he got.

While Andrews may be the New Orleans’ Bruno Mars, Shaw is its Mick Jagger, full of swagger and heart.

Stone, meanwhile, brought the soul. Arriving after 9:20 p.m., the barefoot chanteuse managed to provide yet another lesson for those embracing music careers.

Given the full lights/smoke/carpet treatment, she showed how a star makes the most of a moment Her “Love Me” was electric.

The 30-year-old Grammy winner nicely demonstrated how to work a lyric for maximum effect, too,  and served a healthy dose of heart in the process.

Stone, Shorty and Shaw? Saturday we learned it’s a firm designed to win every time.

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