Details for bridge - 4-10-2019

BRIDGE

Does he
have the
king or queen?

By Phillip Alder
Olivia Williams, an
Englishwoman who has appeared
in some 40 movies, said,
“My father was king of the
guidebooks, and our holidays
were always planned, taking us
from a great gallery to an ace
cafe to a beautiful view. And as
an actor, I loathe improvisation
because there’s no structure and
no one knows what’s going on.”
At the bridge table, defenders
like to use their aces to kill
declarer’s kings. But sometimes an ace serves a different purpose —
to uncover the information that a defender needs to defeat a contract.
How does that apply in this deal? West leads the club queen against
four spades. What happens after that?
If using two-over-one, North would respond with a forcing one
no-trump, planning to rebid three spades on the next round to show
game-invitational strength with three-card spade support. Notice
the drawback compared to Standard American in that South does
not know about North’s diamond suit, which would help South in a
borderline situation.
East overtakes the club queen and cashes a second club. But
what does he do next?
He does not know! Does West have the spade queen or the heart
king?
If West has the spade queen, East can cash the heart ace, then
play a third club so that West can overruff South. But if West has the
heart king, the defenders can take two clubs and two hearts.
East finds out by cashing the heart ace, denying the king after trick
one.
Here, West encourages with his nine, and another heart lead
defeats the contract.
© 2019 UFS, Dist. by Andrews McMeel for UFS

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