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For George Thorogood, bad is good. Good might be OK for some, but bad is his bread and butter. 

So if he tells you he's doing "bad," that's probably a good thing. He initially felt the title of the band's current tour, "Good to be Bad," was bad (in a bad way), but one of his crew members helped him see the good in it. 

"He said, 'The word bad has done very good for you, George,'" Thorogood said in a phone interview. "I thought, 'Yeah, he's got a point.'" 

Thorogood, 69, and his band the Destroyers, will be headlining Sioux City's Saturday in the Park music festival July 6, along with rapper Flo Rida. The musicians will bring their bluesy rock hits like the 1982 classic, "Bad to the Bone," to the 29th annual event at Grandview Park. 

Playing the bandshell isn't the only thing Thorogood is excited about these days. Instrument maker Epiphone recently rolled out a George Thorogood-branded “White Fang” ES-125TDC electric guitar, based on Thorogood's beloved Gibson ES-125 guitar. 

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The guitar, Thorogood said, is the first product he has lent his name to (he joked about a possible George Thorogood makeup kit). It was good for him in more ways than one: the Gibson ES-125 was discontinued decades ago, and it was getting harder and harder to keep his aging guitars from going "bad" on the road. 

He was initially resistant to overtures from Epiphone about the new guitar, but the writing was on the wall for his decades-old Gibsons. Eventually he relented, and the company gave him 10 of the guitars; he was thrilled. 

"One of our sound techs said, 'Look, George, your guitars are beat, we can't use them anymore, and they don't make the kind you play anymore, and we're spending more money and more time repairing something that just doesn't work anymore,'" he said. 

So instead of a Gibson, Thorogood will be playing an Epiphone at SITP. 

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This is the fifth year Thorogood and the Destroyers are doing something that seems, if nothing else, nice to the bone -- they're donating a portion of their ticket sales from the tour to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). 

Thorogood said there are many people in his life who have one, or both, of these medical conditions. Too many people to count, really. 

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"Yeah I got somebody in my life with (those) diseases, and that person is everybody," he said. "I don't single any one person out. Someone said, 'Are you doing this for anyone special?' And I said, 'Yeah, all of 'em!' That's why we're doing it." 

Crowds no doubt expect a vivacious and intense stage presence from George Thorogood and The Destroyers. How does a man of his age keep up his energy on tour?

The answer is more mundane than you might expect. (Hint: it's not stimulants, bad though they may be.) 

"I have never underestimated the value of a good night's sleep," Thorogood said. But that doesn't mean he's an early-to-bed, early-to-rise type: "Our work is at night, so everybody else's daytime is my nighttime." 

Thorogood said he learned the importance of sleep from legendary musicians Chuck Berry and John Lee Hooker, men who apparently understood the value of going to bed. They never told him as much directly, but he learned from observation. 

"Rest is an essential thing out here, more than food, more than anything," Thorogood said.  

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