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In recent years, the Saturday in the Park crowd ebbed and flowed as the acts came and went. Saturday, the park just seemed to fill up until there wasn’t a spot to be found for, say, a last-minute Flo Rida fan.

That’s surprising, too, considering this was an eclectic lineup, filled with plenty to ponder.

Luckily, George Thorogood and the Destroyers had a key 6:45 p.m. timeslot. The band has curated its set list for maximum effect and 69-year-old George? He knows how to work a crowd.

Kicking it off with “Rock Party,” he segued into “Who Do You Love?” and his version of “Shot Down” and “Night Time,” pushing the crowd to get on board with his version of “Saturday Night Live.”

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He cleaned up the bad-to-the-bone banter, too, and managed to include Sioux City in plenty of lyrics (“Sioux City, the world’s best-kept secret”) and enjoyed enough guitar showcases to qualify for adjudicator status at the next band camp. (He must have one of the biggest guitars in the business, just sayin’.)

The Destroyers gave him that big band sound, too, using saxophonist Buddy Leach to his full abilities. Thorogood demonstrated plenty of Iowa knowledge, as well, dropping in references throughout his fast-paced stint.

Like Brian Setzer many years ago, he knew how to entertain a crowd that was as diverse as the day’s food choices.

When it was Flo Rida’s turn, the attendees were more than ready to “jump, jump, jump,” which happened through the first three songs.

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Blessed with a great deejay and two unstoppable backup dancers, he pushed the party agenda to the edge, even bringing a group of females on stage for “Low.” Hits like “Right Round,” “Good Feeling” and “Where Them Girls At” got their due.

Highly personable, Flo Rida wore jean shorts and what looked like a security vest. He tossed out roses, doused the front row with champagne and offered up shots. He also put on an energetic stage show – one that was just as robust as Pitbull’s last year at Battery Park.

Meanwhile, Liz Phair had the kind of summer vibe Melissa Etheridge and Bonnie Raitt embraced. She praised the festival, said she had a great time at the Mardi Gras parade and couldn’t believe the number of folks in Grandview Park.

“Thank you for having me,” she said early on in her set. To prove she wasn’t prepped for the laid-back day, she came dressed in a sparkly skirt, black top and boots – and managed to sweat her way through a number of hits without stopping for a break.

While Phair served as a bridge between the day’s acts, she was a nice afternoon break, singing songs some may have grown up with, while offering new fare for the uninitiated.

At the end of her fall tour, Phair said, she was at Wrigley Field and was inspired to write “God Loves Baseball.” It showcased her flair with lyrics and helped pave the way for “Extraordinary” and “Why Can’t I?,” two of those “open a vein” songs that give you a real sense of the source of her music.

Surprisingly, Phair didn’t seem as blunt as her songs. Amiable, bouncy and giving, she embraced the day and got a pretty good hug back.

Early SITP adapters gave big props to the Michigan Rattlers and Con Brio, the openers for Phair.

In all, it was like visiting a musical mall: something for everyone.

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