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Appearances can be deceiving.

“Kinky Boots” isn’t a one- or even two-man show. It’s a musical that needs three men to show how change can take many forms.

The flashiest role, of course, is Lola, the drag queen who convinces Charlie Price to manufacture boots for men who like to wear high heels. But it’s a third -- factory worker Don -- who slyly slips in and reveals how the actions of one can monumentally affect the responses of others.

The national touring company of “Kinky Boots” (which played Wednesday at the Orpheum Theatre) is a wowser, giving Connor Allston (as Charlie) and Kenneth Mosley (as Lola) the beats and numbers they need to impress. But they wouldn’t be half as effective without James Fairchild as the stereotypical Don, representing another angle to the story.

The three swirl together when Charlie discovers his father’s shoe business is floundering. By accident, he meets Lola, realizes there’s a market for sturdy, sexy boots and strikes a deal. The two prep for the big Milan fashion show but run up against opposition from workers who think the niche market is not their niche.

Lola confronts Don and the “will they or won’t they?” questions swirl.

Director/choreographer Jerry Mitchell keeps it all moving at a fast pace, even putting his actors on a conveyor belt for “Everybody Say Yeah,” one of Cyndi Lauper’s most infectious songs, and a rousing first-act closer.

While Harvey Fierstein’s book hits all the necessary emotional notes, it doesn’t quite fit with Lauper’s deep lyrics. She gives both leading men touching songs (Lola’s “Not My Father’s Son” and Charlie’s “Soul of a Man”) and pumps up enough volume to make Lola’s angels shine in everything they do. The drag queens amaze, executing kicks and splits in the highest of heels. They don’t get individual moments but manage to stand out during a fight scene, a runway number and a club gig.

Combining the sass of Sheryl Lee Ralph with a hint of Eartha Kitt, Mosley creates a Lola (and, later, a Simon) who’s immediately likable and, ultimately, vulnerable. He’s a wonder.

Allston has the tougher role, largely because he doesn’t get the sassy lines or the big reveals. He goes toe-to-toe with Mosley and claims his own spotlight.

Both have great voices; both sell this show like it’s the newest Air Jordan.

To lend romantic tension, Fierstein forces Charlie to choose between a selfish fiancée (Ashley North) and an oh-so-funny co-worker (Karis Gallant). It’s no contest, but the Broadway version of “The Bachelor” at least gets two strong women in the cast (no matter how hit-and-miss the British accents are).

Because the plot is so simple, “Kinky Boots” doesn’t seem like it has the tread to last. It’s sturdier than you think and a nice way to give preconceived notions the boot.

Two days after you see it, you’ll realize just how well it fits – and wears.

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