Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit

Siouxland Tolerance Week will be held April 9-13, 2018

  • 0

Siouxland Tolerance Week will be held April 9-13, 2018

Monday, April 9 - 6:30 - WITCC Lifelong Learning in the Cargill Auditorium

Screening of the documentary Joachim Prinz - I Shall Not Be Silent

In Berlin in the 1930’s, the civil rights of Jews were systematically stripped away. A young rabbi refused to be silent. His name was Joachim Prinz and he set out to restore the self-esteem of the German Jews. Knowing the Nazis were monitoring his every word, and despite repeated arrests, Prinz continued to preach about the value of Judaism. He saved many lives by encouraging Jews to emigrate from Germany.

Expelled from Germany in 1937, Prinz arrived in the United States, the land where democracy had supposedly triumphed over bigotry and hatred. Here, he witnessed racism against African Americans and realized the American ideal was not a reality.

As rabbi of Temple B’nai Abraham in Newark, NJ and later as President of the American Jewish Congress, Prinz became a leader of the civil rights movement. Prinz worked to organize the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, declaring, “bigotry and hatred are not the most urgent problem. The most urgent, the most disgraceful, the most shameful and the most tragic problem is silence.” Moments later, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have A Dream” speech.

Throughout his career, Prinz spoke out for justice, unconcerned with the popularity of his positions. He identified with the prophets, writing in a 1975 letter, “Remember the Biblical adage, ‘For the sake of Zion, I shall not be silent.”

Tuesday, April 10 - 12 Noon - Sioux City Public Museum

The opening of The Sioux City Tolerance Week exhibit.  A light lunch will be served, RSVP to the Sioux City Museum at 279-6174.  Admission is limited to the first 90 RSVPs. The exhibit will be displayed during the month of April.  The Sioux City Tolerance Week exhibit is a collection of essays and art projects submitted since 2005, lists of school participants and feature presentations.  It will showcase the areas where people need to have more tolerance, including bullying and many forms of discrimination.  The exhibit was created to better understand the events of Tolerance Week and how they fit into the Siouxland schools and community and our desired outcomes.  Selected photos by the late Sioux City native Vernon Tott, a tank driver who took photos of the newly liberated prisoners at the German concentration camp Ahlem will also be displayed.

Tuesday, April 10 - 6:30 - Sioux City Orpheum Theatre Lobby

Screening of the PBS documentary Violins of Hope.

Violins of Hope: Strings of the Holocaust, narrated by Academy Award-winner Adrien Brody, is a documentary featuring Israeli second-generation violinmaker Amnon Weinstein and his efforts to restore violins recovered from the Holocaust. Some were played by Jewish prisoners in concentration camps; others belonged to the Klezmer musical culture, which was all but destroyed by the Nazis. Played before and during the Holocaust, the Violins of Hope instruments have been painstakingly restored and serve as testaments to the resilience of the human spirit and the power of music to lift hearts in even the most horrific of circumstances.

Wednesday, April 11 - 9:30 - Sioux City Orpheum Theatre

Area 8th grade students will attend a performance of I am a StarThe Songs and Poems of Inge Auerbacher featuring members of the Sioux City Community Youth Theatre singing original music and the poetry of Terezin Survivor Inge Auerbacher.  Dr. Auerbacher will guide the audience through the performance.

Wednesday, April 11 - 7:30 - Sioux City Orpheum Theatre

We are delighted to welcome Inge Auerbacher back to Sioux City for opening night of I am a Star:  The Songs and Poems of Inge Auerbacher featuring members of the Sioux City Community Youth Theatre singing original music and the poetry of Terezin Survivor Inge Auerbacher.  Ms Auerbacher will guide the audience through the performance.

There will be a pre-Tolerance Week art and essay program.  This contest is designed to have the youth participants reflect on the current state of intolerance and hatred through their writings and works of art. The contest is open to middle and high school students. Submissions will address courage to be yourself, stand up for others and do the right thing. Essays are limited to 400 words or less.  Artwork size is limited to 11”x 14” or smaller.  In addition to art and essays, other forms of expression will be accepted.  The contest winners will be announced at the Wednesday evening event at the Orpheum Theatre. We will then utilize the intolerance and hatred themes identified by the students within their artwork and essays for the future Tolerance Week overarching topical themes and the development of related humanities programming and events.


Contest Information for Middle and High School Students.

This contest is designed to have the youth participants reflect on the current state of intolerance and hatred through their writings and works of art. The contest is open to middle and high school students. Submissions will address courage to be yourself, stand up for others and do the right thing. Essays are limited to 400 words or less. Artwork size is limited to 11”x 14” or smaller.  Entries are due at the end of the day on Wednesday, April 4. Email to grlindblade@gmail.com or drop at 1922 Pierce Street.  Entries must include student’s and teacher’s names, grade, school and email addresses. This information was in the March issue of Kid Scoop News

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News