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Where are self-driving cars? Here's why they're farther down the road
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Where are self-driving cars? Here's why they're farther down the road

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Tesla made headlines with the beta launch of its Full Self-Driving system. That system comes with a disclaimer saying, “It may do the wrong thing at the worst time, so you must always keep your hands on the wheel and pay extra attention to the road.”

Tesla’s system has impressive capabilities, but it’s definitely not hands-free driving. A few years ago, news stories seemed to say that autonomous vehicles were just a few years away.

Well, it’s been a few years, and autonomous vehicles are, alas, still in the future.

Behind the Wheel Self-Driving Cars

A Chrysler Pacifica hybrid outfitted with Waymo’s suite of sensors and radar is displayed in 2017 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Right now, there is no car on sale that can drive itself without requiring the driver to pay attention to the road and be prepared to take control of the vehicle. In fact, some automakers have slowed down their timelines.

Right now, there is no car on sale that can drive itself without requiring the driver to pay attention to the road and be prepared to take control of the vehicle. In fact, some automakers have slowed down their timelines.

Here are three reasons you can’t buy a self-driving car today and one place you’re likely to find them first.

Rust in peace: These cars aren't returning in 2021

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