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A day after the Supreme Court’s bombshell ruling overturning Roe v. Wade ended the constitutional right to abortion, emotional protests and prayer vigils are turning to resolve as several states enact bans and both supporters and foes of abortion rights map out their next moves. A Texas group that helps women pay for abortions has halted its efforts while evaluating its legal risk under a ban it says will disproportionately hurt poor and minority women. Mississippi’s only abortion clinic is continuing to see patients while awaiting a 10-day notice that will trigger a ban. Some elected officials are vowing to protect women’s access to abortion, while opponents of the procedure say their fight is far from over.

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

The bipartisan bill signed by President Joe Biden that aims to address gun violence will incrementally toughen requirements for young people to buy guns, deny firearms from more domestic abusers and help local authorities temporarily take weapons away from people judged to be dangerous. Most of the measure's $13 billion cost will go to bolster mental health programs and for schools, which have been targeted in high-profile mass shootings. The bill omits tougher restrictions that Democrats have long championed, such as a ban on assault-type weapons and background checks for all gun transactions. Still, the bill is the most impactful firearms violence measure that Congress has approved since enacting a now-expired assault weapons ban in 1993.

More than a month ago, a stunning leak of a draft opinion by Justice Samuel Alito indicated that the Supreme Court was prepared to take the momentous step of overruling the Roe v. Wade decision from 1973 and stripping away women’s constitutional protections for abortion. And that’s what the court’s conservative majority ended up doing Friday. When the court heard arguments in the abortion case from Mississippi in December, it was clear to observers there was substantial support among the conservatives for overturning Roe. But even before those arguments and Friday’s decision, the justices had much to say in public about abortion over the years — in opinions, votes, Senate confirmation testimony and elsewhere.

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