{{featured_button_text}}

Thumbs down

What?

Bizarre.

That word sums up our reaction to the latest controversial comment from our congressman, Republican Steve King.

In defending the position of no exceptions for abortion in cases of rape or incest, King said this to the Westside Conservative Club in Urbandale on Wednesday:

"What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled those people out that were products of rape and incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that? Considering all the wars and all the rape and pillage that has taken place ...? I know I can't certify that we're not part of a product of that. And I'd like to think every one of the lives of us are as precious as any other life."

None of us would be here today if not for rape and incest? What?

The mind reels.

For constituents of the 4th District, who deserve better, it's another King-created week of embarrassment under the national spotlight.

There he goes again

In a visit to a petrochemical plant under construction in Pennsylvania on Tuesday, President Trump returned again to criticism of wind energy.

“When the wind stops blowing, it doesn’t make any difference, does it? Unlike those big windmills that destroy everybody’s property values, kill all the birds,” he said.

Not exactly music to ears here in Iowa, the nation's second-ranked state for installed wind capacity.

As we have said before, the wind industry is, from any perspective, a winner for our state. In addition to supporting, directly and indirectly, some 8,000 jobs, the thousands of wind turbines dotting Iowa's landscape help keep electric rates stable for utility customers, put more money in the pockets of farmers and other rural landowners in the form of lease payments, create export potential and increase property tax revenue. Plus, it's friendly to our environment.

That's a message Iowa's leaders should send to the White House.

Thumbs up

Presidential candidates will take part in local forum

Nine presidential candidates will take part in a public forum focusing on issues of importance to Native Americans at the Orpheum Theatre in Sioux City next Monday and Tuesday.

The Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum is billed by organizers as a first-of-its-kind event. Hosts include Four Directions, the Native Organizers Alliance, the National Congress of American Indians, the Native American Rights Fund, the Coalition of Large Tribes and the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Association.

Attending will be Democratic candidates Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Marianne Williamson, Steve Bullock, Julian Castro, John Delaney and Bill de Blasio and Independent candidate Mark Charles.

Over the two days, each candidate will make an individual appearance and respond to questions from tribal leaders and Native American youths.

We encourage community support for this unique, important event.

West Seventh may get more improvements

The City Council on Monday approved a resolution authorizing Jill Wanderscheid, neighborhood services manager, to submit an application for a 2019 Missouri River Historical Development grant of $125,400 for the creation of four murals and the purchase and installation of five sculptures, which would be placed on West Seventh Street between Hamilton Boulevard and Wesley Parkway.

The goal is to have the murals and sculptures in place by next summer.

Our hope is MRHD gives the OK for the grant and what strikes us as a wonderful idea for additional enhancement of West Seventh Street proceeds.

Trump backs off - a little

Responding to pressure from businesses and growing fears the trade war with China is threatening the U.S. economy, the Trump administration will delay to Dec. 15 most of the additional tariffs it planned to impose on Chinese goods beginning Sept. 1 and will drop plans for others altogether, The Associated Press reported in Wednesday's Journal.

Any news that doesn't add more fuel to this fire is welcome news - in particular, in agriculture states like Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota where farmers bear a heavy burden for the continuing U.S.-China trade war.

Be the first to know - Sign up for Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0

Load comments