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The U.S. has renewed credibility on global climate issues and will be able to inspire other nations in their own efforts, experts say, after the Democrats pushed their big economic bill through the Senate on Sunday. The legislation is the single biggest investment in climate change in U.S. history, putting about $375 billion towards climate change-fighting strategies such as investments in renewable energy production and tax rebates for consumers to buy new or used electric vehicles. The impending passage of the first ever significant climate legislation in the U.S. changes the outlook internationally, including in China, India and other high-emitting nations, several experts said.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to speed up the state's transition to non-carbon electricity sources and accelerate its timeline for lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Both are among proposals the Democratic governor has delivered to state lawmakers as they hash out how to spend $19.3 billion on climate-related proposals. Newsom also wants to create a policy for permitting carbon dioxide removal projects and ban new oil and gas wells near homes and schools. He would put the state's 2045 carbon neutrality goal into law.

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The estimated $740 billion economic package from Democrats is nowhere near what President Joe Biden first envisioned with his effort to rebuild America’s public infrastructure and family support systems. The Senate has approved the slimmer but still substantial compromise package, and it heads next to the House. It's made up of health care, climate change and deficit-reduction strategies, in hopes of tackling inflation and making the most sizable investment ever in fighting global warming. A major component is capping out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for seniors in the Medicare program at $2,000 a year. It also applies $300 billion federal deficit reduction.

Global warming is producing more extreme weather. That can mean extended power outages in places like New Orleans. A grassroots network is launching “Community Lighthouses” to meet the challenge. These solar-powered electricity hubs can provide a lifeline after a disaster, enabling neighbors to recharge phones and equipment and refrigerate medicines. Each lighthouse will be supported by a team of volunteers familiar with their neighborhood. Organizer Broderick Bagert said organizers felt powerless as the city struggled to deliver basics after Hurricane Ida last year. He says instead of questioning why someone else doesn't take care of the problem, "the real question is, ’why don't WE?'"

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The estimated $740 billion economic package from Democrats is nowhere near what President Joe Biden first envisioned with his effort to rebuild America’s public infrastructure and family support systems. It had a price tag of $4 trillion and it stalled in Congress. The slimmer but still substantial compromise package is now on track toward Senate voting this weekend. It's made up of health care, climate change and deficit reduction strategies, in hopes of tackling inflation and bringing down deficits. A major component is capping out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for seniors in the Medicare program at $2,000 a year.

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An unexpected deal reached by Senate Democrats would be the most ambitious action ever taken by the United States to address global warming and could help President Joe Biden come close to meeting his pledge to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. The deal would spend nearly $370 billion over 10 years to boost electric vehicles, jump-start renewable energy such as solar and wind power and develop alternative energy sources such as hydrogen. The deal stunned lawmakers and activists who had given up hope that legislation could be enacted after West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin said he could not support the measure because of inflation concerns.

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President Joe Biden’s initial effort to rebuild America’s public infrastructure and family support systems had a price tag of $4 trillion. And it stalled in Congress. A much slimmer but still substantial compromise package costing $739 billion is now being considered by lawmakers. With strategies aimed at inflation-fighting health care, climate change and deficit reduction, the new measure appears headed toward quick votes in the Democratic-controlled House and Senate. A major component is allowing the Medicare program to negotiate prescription drug prices with pharmaceutical companies. That could save the federal government some $288 billion over 10 years, money that would help seniors pay for their medications.

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Massachusetts House and Senate lawmakers have approved a compromise bill mandating some steps the state needs to take to meet a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The Massachusetts House approved the compromise bill on a 143-9 vote Thursday. The Senate then voted 38-2 in favor of the bill. The bill takes more aggressive steps toward battling tailpipe emissions. It would increase to $3,500 the rebate for qualifying purchases and leases of zero-emission passenger cars and light duty trucks. Republican Gov. Charlie Baker has 10 days to review the legislation and decide whether to sign or veto it.

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The United States is putting pressure on Mexico over energy policies that Washington says unfairly favor Mexico's state-owned electricity and oil companies over American competitors and clean-energy suppliers. Among the specific issues in dispute is an amendment to Mexican law last year that the United States says gives an unfair edge to electricity produced by Mexico’s state-owned utility Federal Electricity Commission over cleaner sources of energy such as wind and solar. The United States also protests a 2019 regulation that gives only state oil and gas company Petroleos Mexicanos extra time to comply with tougher environmental standards.

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Developers in rural Utah who want to create big underground caverns to store hydrogen fuel won approval for a $504 million federal loan this spring. They plan to convert the site of a 40-year-old coal plant to cleanly-made hydrogen by 2045. The seasonal storage project is one of of several undertakings that could help determine how big a role hydrogen will play in providing reliable, carbon-free energy in the future. In Utah, it's won support across the political spectrum. Officials hope efforts to transition the power plant to cleanly-made hydrogen could offset job loss in the declining coal industry.

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Officials from 40 countries are meeting in Berlin to discuss how to stay focused on fighting climate change while the world reels from the economic fallout of the pandemic and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The U.N. secretary general on Monday admonished countries to take action instead of playing a “blame game.” European nations vowed to fulfill their climate targets even as the war in Ukraine prompts some to seek new fossil fuel sources and turn at least temporarily to coal to make up for shortfalls in Russian energy deliveries. But those energy shifts are viewed with suspicion by developing countries. South Africa's environment minister says “we cannot have backtracking” on coal by rich nations.

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President Joe Biden is promising “strong executive action” to combat climate change, despite setbacks that have restricted his ability to regulate carbon emissions and boost clean energy such as wind and solar power. The Supreme Court last month limited how the nation’s main anti-air pollution law can be used to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. And this past week, Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin said he wants to delay sweeping environmental legislation that Democrats have pushed as central to achieving Biden’s ambitious climate goals. Biden has pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. On Friday, he said “action on climate change and clean energy remains more urgent than ever.″

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The nation’s largest public utility is seeking proposals for for a huge addition of carbon-free electricity. The Tennessee Valley Authority’s request for carbon-free proposals seeks up to 5,000 megawatts of carbon-free energy before 2029. It’s the first request nuclear industry experts know of that pairs new nuclear technologies with wind and solar. The request includes other options, such as hydroelectric, geothermal, and battery energy storage systems. The move comes juxtaposed with the federal utility’s lingering proposal to shut down the massive coal-fired Cumberland Fossil Plant in Tennessee and replace it with natural gas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has raised concerns over that plan. TVA's final decision is expected in the coming months.

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The largest category of power plants applying to connect to the U.S. grid are now solar. Over a third of those are hybrids that include battery storage.

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