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Sioux City musicians share how they live their artistic lives (*SPOILER: Having a side gig won't hurt)
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Sioux City musicians share how they live their artistic lives (*SPOILER: Having a side gig won't hurt)

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SIOUX CITY -- When musicians Shawn Blomberg and Angela Lambrecht hit the festival circuit in Florida later this year, the couple will be loading up their RV with guitars, drums, harmonicas and all of the percussion instruments they'll need to perform a unique and bluesy form of Americana soul.

Blomberg and Lambrecht, both founders of the Sioux City-based group Ultra Violet Fever, also plan on bringing Zephyr, the group's pet dog and designated "p.r. manager."

In addition, they plan on taking boxes of their self-designed clothing, art pieces and one-of-a-kind jewelry to sell.

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And if there's room, Blomberg, who is also a licensed massage therapist, might bring his massage table for their southeast tour.

"When you're trying to make a living as a musician, you end up wearing many hats," Lambrecht, who is engaged to Blomberg, explained. "In addition to being a performer, you become a driver, a roadie and a marketer of merchandise as well."

Actually, Blomberg can add one more skill set to his CV. The Sioux City native was also the engineer for Ultra Violet Fever's recently-released EP, "Epimedium Sagittatum."

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"You are always trying to expand your fan base and exposing your music for new audiences," he said. "You do that by networking with other musicians and hitting the road as much as you can."

ON THE ROAD AGAIN

Musician day jobs Angela Lambrecht

A musician since childhood, Angela Lambrecht provides private lessons when she isn't performing as a member of the Sioux City-based Ultra Violet Fever alternative music group.

This is something that is possible for Lambrecht, who teaches private music as a side gig, and Blomberg, who set his own schedule as a massage therapist for Sioux City's Massage and Body.

"If we have to, Angie and I can go on the road for a few months at a time," Blomberg said.

However, this isn't possible for their Ultra Violet Fever bandmates Adrian Kolbo, a business development manager, or Randall Wood, a UnityPoint Health St. Luke's Hospital emergency room doctor. 

"Adrian and Randall have schedules that aren't quite so flexible," Lambrecht admitted. "When they want to play they have to take vacation time."

According to Blomberg, music was their sole passion when growing up.

SCHOOL OF ROCK

"The first musical instrument I played was the tenor saxophone in the fifth grade," Blomberg said, smiling at the memory. "It wasn't until I was 14 years old that I learned to play guitar and it was Adrian who taught me."

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So, why did Blomberg make the switch to guitar?

"Girls like guitar players more than they do sax players," he answered nonchalantly.

Eventually, Blomberg became proficient in playing bass, piano and ukelele in addition to guitar and sax. He eventually teamed with Kolbo, who plays bass and guitar for gigs in both Sioux City and Seattle, Washington.

"Yeah, I guess my music was somewhat inspired by grunge," Blomberg said of his west coast experience. "But I was also influenced by musicians (as diverse as) John Prine, Carole King and, even Lynyrd Skynyrd."

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Blomberg may have gotten a better appreciation of the world of jazz, via his friend Wood.

MEDICINE MAN

Unlike Blomberg or Kolbo, Wood didn't really play music until he was in mid-20s. Although a master at the keyboard, he can't read music.

randall wood

If you're in need of medical attention in the middle of the night, you'll probably see Randall Wood, an emergency room doctor at UnityPoint Health St. Luke's. If you're a fan of alternative music, you'll also recognize Wood as keyboardist for the popular band Ultra Violet Fever.

"I generally play what I feel," Wood, who cites jazz legends like Thelonious Monk and John Lee Hooker as influences, explained. 

"(Randall) had that kind of mind," Wood's wife Christi said. "I think his musical ability is based on science."

Wood agrees, saying his music is similar to the work he does in an emergency room.