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Gobblers & Goblets: Which wines should you serve with your Thanksgiving meal?

Gobblers & Goblets: Which wines should you serve with your Thanksgiving meal?

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Valentine's Day wine

M's on 4th's Vernon Meyer says Moscato, port and Prosecco wines pair nicely with Thanksgiving chocolates while a quality Gewurztraminer is a turkey;s best friend.

Two things you should know about Thanksgiving wines.

1) Your guests will be gobbling up your turkey if you serve a nice Chardonnay or a dry Riesling.

2) Your guests will be throwing (Plymouth) rocks if you serve a raspberry Framboise with a side of pumpkin pie.

That's according to co-owner and resident "wine guy" Vernon Meyer at M's on 4th, 1021 Fourth St.

"Turkey or any poultry tends to be a bit dry," he said. "So, you're looking for a wine that compliments that taste and doesn't distract from it."

To that end, chardonnay, Riesling, Zinfandel, Pinot Noir and, even, champagne can hit the spot on Turkey Day.

However, Meyer said his favorite wine with Thanksgiving fare happens to be Gewurztraminer.

Um ... Ger-whatsa-miner!?!

Actually pronounced Geh-VERTZ-trah-mee-nur, this aromatic and slightly spicy wine has the tastes of a traditional meal.

"It has a bit of nutmeg in its flavor profile," Meyer said. "So, it should be right at home with a sage-rubbed turkey and stuffing."

To be honest, Thanksgiving dinner can be considered quite a challenging meal because of so many diverse elements.

For instance, turkey gravy and stuffing can be savory while candied yams can tip the balance toward sweetness.

It is also an occasion where dinner is a bit more protracted than a sit-down meal. This means you want wine that'll wet one's whistle while the Macy's Day Parade is in full swing.

But what about the old adage of red wine with red meats and white wines with something a bit more birdy.

"The most important rule of food and wine pairings is that there are no rules, only guidelines," Meyers said. 

Having said that, please do not pair a fruity and acidic Framboise with anything in the pumpkin family.

"I don't know what it is but tart raspberry mixed with pumpkin spice just isn't very appealing," Meyers said. 

But Framboise and a hunk of chocolate cake? Dessert of the Gods!

On the other hand, a nice chilled wine is exceptional no matter what you stuff in your face.

"Just put a chillled wine in the fridge for 30 to 45 minutes," Meyer said. "Then, you'll have a real crowd-pleaser."

Simply, remember that red wines have a shelf life of about 3 to 5 days while white can still be drinkable for 5 to 7 days.

"For some reason, I've become an expert on wine that is on the cusp of not being good," Meyer said. "I know after a certain period, even the best wines turn into cooking wine."

Two things you should know about Thanksgiving wines.

1) Your guests will be gobbling up your turkey if you serve a nice Chardonnay or a dry Riesling.

2) Your guests will be throwing (Plymouth) rocks if you serve a raspberry Framboise with a side of pumpkin pie.

That's according to co-owner and resident "wine guy" Vernon Meyer at M's on 4th, 1021 Fourth St.

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